Leeds University Library

Lecture capture: using recordings for note making

Making notes from lectures helps to strengthen your learning. It clarifies your thinking; checks that you've understood what was being said; and helps you to organise your ideas. You can use lecture notes to plan for assignments or revise for exams. 

Whilst scribbling or typing in lectures, students sometimes find that they have missed a key fact, definition or concept for their notes. Lecture capture recordings can remove that distraction and free up time to think about your own response to the material, and to what your lecturer is saying about it.

One way to use lecture capture recordings is for critical note-making. 

Start with some brief notes from the lecture

  • Only note down the keywords, and brief summary points
  • Think about what your tutor is saying and write a brief note on your reaction to the material. Do you agree or disagree? Why? What do you need to know more about?

Expand on your notes from the recording

  • Expand on your keyword/summary notes. Pick up any facts, names, readings or definitions that you didn't note down at the time. You can skip to a specific part of the lecture if you have made a note of a slide to review
  • Include more illustrative detail about the concepts, theories or arguments. You can stop and start the recording, or play it back as often as you need to
  • You might have done some more reading on the topic since the lecture - make a note of how your initial reactions have (not) changed?

A lecturer might make a personal capture recording to introduce you to a topic ahead of a lecture or seminar, or act as an extra resource to clarify or expand on what was said in a lecture.

The same note-making strategies apply; make a note of any concepts, theories, arguments or processes you didn't understand and ask your lecturer to clarify them in class.

Take a look at our note taking and note making tutorial for more information about developing this skill.