Leeds University Library

November events at Treasures Gallery

Published Tuesday 25 October 2016

photo of people surrounding broken tank

Hungarian revolution, heraldry and challenging hate crime

Challenging hate crime: voices of Gypsies and Travellers

Date: Wednesday 23 November 2016
Location: Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, Parkinson Court
Time: 11am-4pm
Cost: Free, drop-in activity

A Being Human 2016 event exploring hate crime against Gypsies and Travellers.

Join us as we use sound, performance, and archival sources to explore the issue of hate crime against Gypsies and Travellers. In this immersive long-form performance piece, verbatim theatre techniques animate academic and community research on hate crime; we examine the fear it engenders and the hope needed to overcome it. Performances continue throughout the day; drop-in at any time.

The work has been developed by members of Leeds GATE and students from the University of Leeds, together with artists Vanessa Cardui and Sara Allkins, using archive material at Leeds GATE and Leeds University Library Special Collections.

Bends, Bordures and Lions Rampant: An Introduction to Heraldry

Date: Thursday 24 November 2016
Location: Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, Parkinson Court
Time: 1-2pm

Cost: Free, booking required

Join Dr Alan Murray for a talk on the fascinating world of heraldry.

Coats of arms are mostly associated with images of medieval knights, but they are still part of modern life. Dr Alan Murray discusses why and how coats of arms originated, and explains the principles behind blazonry: the arrangements of symbols, shapes and colours which make up the science of heraldry.

The Hungarian Revolution and the Refugee Experience, 1956 - 2016

Date: Monday 21 November 2016
Location: Treasures of the Brotherton Gallery, Parkinson Court
Time: 6-8pm
Cost: Free, booking required

Join Professor Simon Hall as he examines the refugee experience following the Hungarian Uprising in 1956.

In the early hours of Sunday 4 November 1956 the Soviet Union sent 60,000 troops, tanks and two airforce divisions into Hungary to crush a popular revolution that had captured the imagination of much of the world. In the brutal aftermath, some 150,000 Hungarians fled; 21,000 of these found sanctuary in the UK. The University of Leeds was one of four higher education institutions to offer accommodation to student refugees.

This public lecture on the Hungarian Revolution by Professor Simon Hall coincides with an exhibition of the work of the conceptual artist and Hungarian refugee Gy├Ârgy Gordon at the Stanley and Audrey Burton Gallery. The event will also include discussion and an exhibition on the refugee experience.

Book a free place at 'The Hungarian Revolution and the Refugee Experience, 1956-2016

For further information please contact the Gallery by email: gallery@leeds.ac.uk or telephone: (0113) 343 9803, or visit their webpage.