Collection: YAS/MD59: MIDDELTON OF STOCKELD, FAMILY AND ESTATE RECORDS

Archive Collection icon Archive Collection: MIDDELTON OF STOCKELD, FAMILY AND ESTATE RECORDS

Details

Title: MIDDELTON OF STOCKELD, FAMILY AND ESTATE RECORDS

Level: Collection 

Classmark: YAS/MD59

Date: 12th century -19th century

Size and medium: 35 boxes

Persistent link: https://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/446541 

Collection group(s): Yorkshire Archaeological and Historical Society

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Description

Arrangement:

In the mid 18th century the archives were arranged in one purely alphabetical sequence into 24 bags. When given to the Society in 1920, they were still contained in bags, numbered 1 to 24, of which number 2 was missing. There was also a bag without number which was then labelled 25. Lists were made, retaining the bag, and later box, number. It is clear, from endorsements on deeds, for example, that this was not the original order, at least for the deeds, and in 2000-2001 they were sorted and listed on more meaningful principles. The 18th century arrangement can also be followed in the schedule dated 1757.

When requesting documents please quote the old and new reference numbers (in the form MD59/10/Hab/77 and MD59/1/2)

Administrative or biographical history

The family were well-connected socially, having alliances with the Plumptons, Vavasours, Calverleys, Eltofts, Towneleys, Ingilbys of Ripley, Constables, Stricklands and Haggerstons, among others. As Catholics and Royalists they suffered for their recusancy in the 16th and 17th centuries, and the papers reflect the difficulties which arose from the sequestration of their estates, and subsequent long-term debts. The collection contains a relatively small proportion of personal material, but there is interesting correspondence from the late 16th and early 17th centuries, and a number of personal and household accounts, particularly for clothing supplied by the best makers in the earlier 17th century. Many accounts and receipts relate to the funeral of Mrs. Mary Middelton, 1644. Cultural references are few, with the exception of a library list compiled in 1718, which notes 342 books in the library at Stockeld.

The collection contains only a few maps and plans, although the surveyor Salomon Swale carried out work for the Middeltons in the early 17th century. A plan of an unidentified house of similar date also survives. The bulk of the collection dates from the period before 1763, when the male line of the Middeltons came to an end.

Material from the collection has been published in: Yorkshire Record Series 65, 69, 76 and 120 (Yorkshire Deeds IV, V, VI and X), YRS 161, Yorkshire Archaeological Journal 72 (2000) and 75 (2003). See also R.Collyer and J. Horsfall Turner, Ilkley: Ancient and Modern, 1885 and D. Carpenter, The Road to Ruin: the Middeltons of Stockeld 1763-1947, 1999

Access and usage

Access

This collection has not been listed in detail and access to parts of it may be restricted under the Data Protection Act and other relevant legislation. If you would like to request access to any part of this collection, please contact Special Collections. Upon receipt of your request, a member of the team will discuss your requirements with you and review relevant material accordingly.

Special Collections require at least 2 working days' notice to retrieve from the collection.

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Collection hierarchy 

What is an archive hierarchy?

Catalogues of archives are usually arranged in hierarchies - one hierarchy for each collection in the archive. The details on display will be of a record at a particular level of the hierarchy. There may be other records above, below, or alongside this record in the same hierarchy. The full hierarchy is shown below.

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What is an archive hierarchy?

Books, manuscripts and archives in Special Collections are usually grouped together in collections. Catalogue records for individual objects link to a collection record, which show the object's context, and associated material.

You can see the full hierarchy under 'In this collection'.

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What is the Level?

Catalogues of archives are usually arranged in hierarchies - one hierarchy for each collection in the archive. The details on display will be of a record at a particular level of the hierarchy. There may be other records above, below, or alongside this record in the same hierarchy. You can see the full hierarchy under 'In this collection'.

Learn more about archive hierarchies


Collection hierarchy 

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