Collection: MS/DEP/Wentworth Woolley Hall: Wentworth family of Woolley Hall Yorkshire, Archive

Archive Collection icon Archive Collection: Wentworth family of Woolley Hall Yorkshire, Archive

Details

Title: Wentworth family of Woolley Hall Yorkshire, Archive

Level: Collection 

Classmark: MS/DEP/Wentworth Woolley Hall

Creator(s): Wentworth Family

Date: 1301-1900

Main language: English

Size and medium: 89 boxes

Persistent link: https://library.leeds.ac.uk/special-collections-explore/6604 

Collection group(s): Estate

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Description

The Brotherton Library holds on deposit a considerable collection of documents and maps relating to the Wentworth family of Woolley and its estates. This branch of the Wentworth family had its seat at Woolley Hall, about five miles south of Wakefield. In 1947, Woolley Hall was sold to the West Riding County Council, and is now used as a college of further education. The papers in the Brotherton Library were deposited by Commander Ewart Wentworth in 1946 and 1949. They are known as the Wentworth-Woolley Hall papers to distinguish them from the Wentworth-Woodhouse collection in Sheffield City Libraries. (The Yorkshire Archaeological Society also holds a considerable collection of Wentworth -Woolley Hall documents, mainly mediaeval.) The papers in the Brotherton Library cover all aspects of the family's estates and interests, and range from the 14th to the 19th centuries. The order of the boxes in which the papers were received when they were deposited has been retained. To help enquirers interested in the Wentworth family and the Woolley area, it was decided that it would be useful (short of preparing a complete calendar of the documents) to replace the brief list made at the time of deposit with one which would give intending users an indication of the amount and type of material in each box. Although two separate deposits were made by Commander Wentworth, in 1946 and 1949, the boxes are numbered consecutively, in one sequence, 1-74. Nos. 1-20 were deposited in 1946, and the remainder in 1949. The sections on Bound Manuscript volumes and Maps were formerly a separate handlist (number 10).

Administrative or biographical history

The Wentworths were one of the most prominent land-owning families in Yorkshire. Sir Thomas Wentworth of Wentworth Woodhouse married Beatrice Woodrove of Woolley, near Wakefield in ca.1514, but a branch of the family was established at Woolley in 1599, when Michael Wentworth purchased an estate from Francis Woodruffe (or Woodrove), whose family had owned land there since the fourteenth century. Woolley Hall is a Jacobean building, dating from 1635, with many later alterations. The surrounding landscape park is largely unchanged since 1800, and includes wooded pleasure grounds.

Arrangement

The boxes are numbered 1-12 and 14-20; documents formerly in Box 13 are now in Box 20

Access and usage

Access

Access to this material is unrestricted.

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Collection hierarchy 

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