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#1 Letter addressed from 'Haworth, Bradford, Yorks'; with pen and ink sketch entitled 'Our Lady of Grief'
#2 Letter addressed from 'Haworth, Bradford, Yorks'; with pen and ink sketch entitled 'Our Lady of Grief'
#3 Letter addressed from 'Haworth, Bradford, Yorks'; with pen and ink sketch entitled 'Our Lady of Grief'
#4 Letter addressed from 'Haworth, Bradford, Yorks'; with pen and ink sketch entitled 'Our Lady of Grief'
#5 Letter addressed from 'Haworth, Bradford, Yorks'; with pen and ink sketch entitled 'Our Lady of Grief'
#6 Letter addressed from 'Haworth, Bradford, Yorks'; with pen and ink sketch entitled 'Our Lady of Grief'
© University of Leeds

Letter 10: Letter from Branwell Brontë to Joseph Bentley Leyland, 28 April 1846 (BC MS 19c Brontë/02/01/10)

Haworth.Bradford.Yor …

Haworth.
Bradford.
Yorks.

My Dear Sir,

As I am anxious - though my return
for your kindness will be like giving a sixpence
back for a sovereign lent - to do my best in
my intended lines on "Morley" I want answers
to the following questions[?] ;

Ist - (As I can [...] if in the map or Gazzeteer)
In what District[?] of Lancashire is Morley situated?

IId - Has the Hall a particular name?

IIId - Do you know the family name of
its owners when the occurrences happened which
I ought to dwell on?

IVth - Can you tell in what century they
happened?

Vth - What, told in the fewest words, was the
nature of the leading occurrence?

If I learn these facts I'll do my best,
but in all I try to write I desire to stick

to probabilities and local characteristics.

Now, after troubling you so much, I
doubt not that you will drive your fist through
that damned medallion in your studio, as being
the effigies of a regular bore.

I cannot, without a smile at myself, think
of my stay for three days in Halifax on a
business which need not have occupied three
hours; but in truth when I fall back on myself
I suffer so mu [...] tchedness that
I cannot withstand my [...] tation to get
out of myself — and for that reason I am
prosecuting enquiries about situations suitable
to me whereby I could have a voyage
abroad. The quietude of home, and the inability
to make my family aware of the
nature of most of my sufferings makes
me write

"Home thoughts are not, with me
Bright, as of yore;
Joys are forgot by me,
Taught to deplore!

My home has taken rest
In an afflicted breast
Which I have often pressed
But — may no more!"

Troubles never come alone — and I have some
little troubles astride the shoulders of the big
one.

Literary exertion would seem a resource,
but the the depression attendant on it, and
the almost hopelessness of bursting through
the barriers of literary cliques[?] circles, and
getting a hearing among publishers, make
me disheartened and indifferent; for I cannot
write what would be thrown, unread,
in to a library fire: Otherwise I have the
materials for a respectably sized volume,
and if I were in London personally I might
perhaps try Henry Moxon[?] — a patronizer
of the sons of rhyme; though I dare say
the poor man often smarts for his liberality
in publishing hideous trash.

As I know that, while here, I might send
a manuscript to London, and say good
bye to it I feel it deleted text folly to
feed the flames of a printers fire.
So much for egotism!

______________________

I enclose a horrible ill drawn daub
done to wile away the times this morning.
I meant it to represent a very rough
figure in stone.

______________________

When all our cheerful hours seem gone for ever;
All lost that caused the body or the mind,
To nourish love or friendship for our kind,
And Charon's boat, prepared - oer Lethe's river -
Our souls to waft, and all our thoughts to sever
From what was once {lifes} light, still there may be
Some well loved bosom to whose pillow we
Could heartily our utter self deliver:
And, if - toward her grave - Death's dreamy road
Our darling's feet should tread, each step by her
Would ⟨draw⟩ our own steps to the same abode,
And make a festival of sepulture;
For, what gave joy, to and joy to us had owed,
Should Death affright us from, when he would her restore?

Yours most sincerely,
P.B.Brontë. Note: 118
Figure 1. "Our Lady of {greif} ". "Nuestra Senora de la pena ".
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