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Walking Home: archive materials

SA_Walking Home/1
In 2010 Simon Armitage spent 19 days walking the 256 mile Pennine Way as a 'modern troubadour'. This online resource presents archive material relating to the walk and creation of Walking Home, held by Special Collections.
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Simon Armitage describes writing 'Walking Home'
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SA_Walking Home archive materials
A summary of the Walking Home archive materials
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Armitage Harmonium proposa
Details of book proposal 1
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Armitage Walking Home Proposal doc
Details of book proposal 2
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SA_Walking Home Red Notebook
introduction to the red notebook
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Walking Home SA/8
prose diary entry for day 0
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Walking Home SA/13
prose diary entry for day 1
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SA_Walking Home/126
Prose diary entry for day 15
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SA_Walking Away/162
red notebook poems introduction
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SA_Walking Home/18
first draft of the poem 'Cotton Grass'
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SA_Walking Home/31
second draft of the poem 'Cotton Grass'
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SA_Walking Home first proof/287
second draft of the poem 'Cotton Grass' continued
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SA_Walking Home_74
blank page entry headed 'fell ponies'
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SA_Walking Home/130
Comparison of three types of writing referring to black huts.
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SA_Walking Home/134
Notes on the changing imagery of 'Above Ickornshaw, Black Huts'
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Armitage Notebook Black Huts
Notes on the importance of landscape for the poem
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SA_Walking Home/108
Notes on the importance of poetic influences
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Walking Home SA_162
writing themes listed at the back of the red notebook
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SA_Walking Home/Glossop Audience
introduction to the Walking Home photograps
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SA_Walking Home/slug088
Walking Home photographs as visual narrative
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SA_Walking Home/digital_image/21
Walking Home: poetry as travel guide
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writing themes listed at the back of the red notebook
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Further reading material for Walking Home.
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The Walking Home archive consists of physical and digital materials which include:

· Simon Armitage’s handwritten walking notebook

· the guidebooks and maps that he used to plan his walk and inform his writing

· digital drafts and proofs of Walking Home

· over 200 photographs

The placement of items in an archive can raise interesting questions. In one of the archive boxes a published copy of Walking Home is kept with the maps and guidebooks used on the original walk.  This prompts us to consider the difference between travel writing and travel guides, and to think about authority and genre. Do we as readers  come to genres with different expectations, and why do we trust some books rather than others? What do we need to ‘find’ ourselves in any given place?

Armitage used the red walking notebook to record daily observations but also to draft poems. This invites us to consider whether poems can also be a type of guide, and if so, in what sense? Further questions include whether landscape is differently represented in poetry and prose, and if so how?  How does the form of landscape writing transform the reader’s engagement with, or perception of, its subject?