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Walking Home: book proposal 1

SA_Walking Home/1
In 2010 Simon Armitage spent 19 days walking the 256 mile Pennine Way as a 'modern troubadour'. This online resource presents archive material relating to the walk and creation of Walking Home, held by Special Collections.
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Simon Armitage describes writing 'Walking Home'
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SA_Walking Home archive materials
A summary of the Walking Home archive materials
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Armitage Harmonium proposa
Details of book proposal 1
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Armitage Walking Home Proposal doc
Details of book proposal 2
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SA_Walking Home Red Notebook
introduction to the red notebook
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Walking Home SA/8
prose diary entry for day 0
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Walking Home SA/13
prose diary entry for day 1
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SA_Walking Home/126
Prose diary entry for day 15
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SA_Walking Away/162
red notebook poems introduction
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SA_Walking Home/18
first draft of the poem 'Cotton Grass'
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SA_Walking Home/31
second draft of the poem 'Cotton Grass'
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SA_Walking Home first proof/287
second draft of the poem 'Cotton Grass' continued
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SA_Walking Home_74
blank page entry headed 'fell ponies'
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SA_Walking Home/130
Comparison of three types of writing referring to black huts.
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SA_Walking Home/134
Notes on the changing imagery of 'Above Ickornshaw, Black Huts'
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Armitage Notebook Black Huts
Notes on the importance of landscape for the poem
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SA_Walking Home/108
Notes on the importance of poetic influences
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Walking Home SA_162
writing themes listed at the back of the red notebook
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SA_Walking Home/Glossop Audience
introduction to the Walking Home photograps
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SA_Walking Home/slug088
Walking Home photographs as visual narrative
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SA_Walking Home/digital_image/21
Walking Home: poetry as travel guide
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writing themes listed at the back of the red notebook
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Further reading material for Walking Home.
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The digital Walking Home files include two book proposals written by Armitage. These help us to understand how the project evolved.

The first book proposal was sent to Penguin, and included memoir and diverse literary walks.  Its working title was Harmonium and other journeys.

The main walk was to follow Gawain’s journey from Camelot to the Green Chapel, as described in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. These legendary locations have been associated with Glastonbury, Somerset, and Lud’s Church on the Derbyshire/Staffordshire border respectively). Other walks traced journeys made by poets including John Clare, William Wordsworth, and Ted Hughes.

This first proposal informs our understanding of Walking Home in several ways. There is a suggestion here that a link between past and present can be forged by walking in others’ footsteps, literally and metaphorically. By retracing their walks we can see what they have seen and understand more clearly their ideas and perceptions.

For Armitage, poetry, geography and biography are inseparable. The final journey in the book proposal makes this explicit. Armitage suggests walking the first stage of the Pennine Way, from Derbyshire to his home village of Marsden, West Yorkshire. This journey will cover ground familiar from child- and adulthood – and represented and re-created in Armitage’s poetry. Armitage hopes to share this walk with his father and ends his proposal ‘I mean to end up at home'.